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For parents

The HPV vaccine can significantly decrease your child's chances of developing HPV-related cancers and diseases.

  • It's best for your child to have the HPV vaccine when they are aged 12–13.

  • The HPV vaccine is delivered in two doses given at least six months apart (children over 15 years require three doses).

  • If you're unsure if your child has missed one or both doses of the HPV vaccine you can check their immunisation status via MyGov, call the Australian Immunisation Register on 1800 653 809 or speak to your GP.

  • If your child’s chance to be vaccinated was missed due to COVID-19 or you have concerns related to COVID-19, visit our COVID-19 and the HPV Vaccine page for more information

Having the vaccine at 12–13 years of age is recommended by Australia's National Immunisation Program. This is because your child's immune system responds best to the vaccine at this age, so they only need two doses (instead of three from age 15 up). It also means they are protected well before most children become sexually active. You may have chosen to have your child vaccinated against meningococcal, polio, hepatitis B, measles, tetanus, whooping cough and other vaccine-preventable diseases as part of the same program when they were younger.

In 2020, the World Health Organization released a strategy to eliminate cervical cancer globally. HPV vaccination is a very important part of the strategy. Excitingly, Australia is predicted to be one of the first countries in the world to achieve cervical cancer elimination. Everyone can play their part in eliminating cervical cancer. You can do your part by ensuring your child receives the HPV vaccine.   

You and your child should decide together whether they have the HPV vaccine. We recommend you take the following steps:

  1. Explore the menus on the left to learn more about HPV and the vaccine.

  2. Ask your child to read the Teens section of the website.

  3. Talk to your doctor if you need more information or see the More information page.

  4. Talk to your child about having the vaccine.

  5. Decide together whether they should have the vaccine.

  6. Return the consent form to school, indicating your decision.

Although you must sign the consent form for your child to have the vaccine as part of your school's program, it is very important that your child understands what the vaccine is, and that you come to a decision together about whether they have the vaccine.

If your child’s chance to be vaccinated was missed due to COVID-19 or you have concerns related to COVID-19, visit our COVID-19 and the HPV Vaccine page for more information. 

The secondary school year the vaccine is given in varies between States and Territories – refer to our table to see how it's being delivered in your area.

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Design and partial content reproduced with the kind permission of the New Zealand Ministry of Health.

The HPV vaccine is a prescription medicine. Medicines have benefits and risks. After reading this website, talk to your doctor about the benefits and risks of this vaccine and to check eligibility.

Females who have had the HPV vaccine still need regular Cervical Screening Tests.