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Why was the HPV vaccine program introduced?

The free National HPV Vaccination Program was introduced in 2007 because extensive trials proved that vaccinating young women with the HPV vaccine was likely to significantly reduce cervical cancer diagnoses and deaths from the disease, as well as a significant number of Pap test abnormalities. The vaccine also protects girls from some cancers of the vagina, vulva and anus.

The decision to introduce the program in Australia was made by the Australian Government after extensive consultation with scientists, epidemiologists and public health experts.

From 2013, boys were included in the free school-based program.

Although cervical cancer is the most common type of cancer caused by HPV, persistent infection is also known to cause penile and anal cancers in men.

Providing equitable and free access to the HPV vaccine will help protect more Australians from HPV-related illnesses, including cancer.

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The vaccine program was introduced because vaccinating young people is likely to significantly reduce HPV-related cancers in Australia.

Design and partial content reproduced with the kind permission of the New Zealand Ministry of Health.

The HPV vaccine is a prescription medicine. Medicines have benefits and risks. After reading this website, talk to your doctor about the benefits and risks of this vaccine and to check eligibility.

Females who have had the HPV vaccine still need regular Pap tests.