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Why should I get the HPV vaccine?

Having the HPV vaccine means you're far less likely to have genital warts, certain types of cancer or other illnesses caused by HPV in the future. The vaccine helps to protect against cervical cancer and some less common cancers, such as penile, vaginal, vulval and throat cancers caused by HPV. It also protects against genital warts. 

Treatment for HPV-related cancers can include surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Cancer Council and important groups such as the World Health Organization all agree that it's a good idea to have the vaccine.

How the vaccine protects you 

Having the HPV vaccine means your body's immune system can produce its own protection (antibodies) against HPV.

The vaccine will help stop you getting the nine HPV types that cause around 90% of cervical cancers, 95% of all HPV-related cancers in men, and 90% of genital warts in men and women.

Getting your parents' consent

If you're at school, your parent/s or guardian will need to sign a consent form for you to have the vaccine. It can be awkward talking to your parent/s or guardian about having the vaccine as it might involve talking about sex (that is how the HPV virus is spready).

But it's important for you both to understand that although you may not be thinking about sex now, the vaccine is best given at a young age (12–13) when your body makes the best immune response to the vaccine. At this age you will only need two doses. 

You can get the HPV vaccine from your doctor without parental consent, as long as your doctor is sure you understand what the vaccine's benefits and risks are.

Watch this video to learn more about how the vaccine works. 

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Having the HPV vaccine means you're far less likely to have genital warts, HPV-related cancer or other illnesses caused by HPV in the future.

Design and partial content reproduced with the kind permission of the New Zealand Ministry of Health.

The HPV vaccine is a prescription medicine. Medicines have benefits and risks. After reading this website, talk to your doctor about the benefits and risks of this vaccine and to check eligibility.

Females who have had the HPV vaccine still need regular Cervical Screening Tests.